Books

The examples found in the Chicago section are based on the style guide The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed., 2010.

Basic Format

For place of publication if the city is not well known, give the name of the city and the state, province or country. If two or more cities are given, use the location listed first. The publisher’s name may be shortened by omitting the words Inc., Co., Ltd., and Publishing Co. If no publication date is given use n.d.

Note

1. First Name Last Name, Title of Book (City: Publisher, Date), page.

1. Natalie Jomini Stroud, Niche News: The Politics of News Choice (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011), 149.

Bibliography

Last Name, First Name. Title of Book. City: Publisher, Date.

Stroud, Natalie Jomini. Niche News: The Politics of News Choice. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.

Book with an editor or translator and no author

The editor or translator takes the place of the author.

Note

1. Martin Hallett and Barbara Karasek, eds., Folk & Fairy Tales, 4th ed. (Peterborough, ON: Broadview Press, 2009), 18-21.

Bibliography

Hallett, Martin, and Barbara Karasek, eds. Folk & Fairy Tales. 4th ed. Peterborough, ON: Broadview Press, 2009.

Book with an author plus an editor, translator

The author’s name appears first. The name of the translator or editor comes after the title. In the note add “trans.” or “ed.” before the translator’s or editor’s name. In the bibliography insert “Edited by” or “Translated by” before the name.

Note

2. Luc Brisson, How Philosophers Saved Myths: Allegorical Interpretation and Classical Mythology, trans. Catherine Tihanyi (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004), 56.

Bibliography

Brisson, Luc. How Philosophers Saved Myths: Allegorical Interpretation and Classical Mythology. Translated by Catherine Tihanyi. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004.

Chapter or essay in book

The title of the chapter is enclosed in quotation marks.

Note

4. Chapter author’s First Name Last Name, “Title of Chapter,” in Book Title, ed. editor’s First Name Last Name (City: Publisher, Date), page(s).

4. David Ludden, “The Process of Empire: Frontiers and Borderlands,” in Tributary Empires in Global History, ed. Peter Fibiger Bang and C. A. Bayly (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), 128-129.

Bibliography

Chapter author’s Last Name, First Name. “Title of Chapter.” In Book Title, edited by First Name Last Name, page range of chapter. City: Publisher, Date of publication.

Ludden, David. “The Process of Empire: Frontiers and Borderlands.” In Tributary Empires in Global History, edited by Peter Fibiger Bang and C. A. Bayly, 125-150. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.

e-Book

Follow the format for a print book and at the end of the citation add the e-book or access information:

  • If the book was accessed through a library database such as ebrary, or EBSCO eBooks, include the name of the database and in parentheses, any identification number (see note 4).
  • If your book was consulted online add the date accessed and the URL or DOI (if available) at the end of the citation. Note that with older works publication information may be missing (see note 5).
  • If the book was downloaded from a library or bookseller include the e-book format (PDF e-book, Kindle edition, etc.) (see note 6).

Don’t forget to include the page numbers. If the e-book doesn’t have page numbers use the chapter number or the section headings in quotations (e.g. “Introduction”).

Note

4. Peter Decker, Old Fences, New Neighbors (Golden, CO: Fulcrum, 2006), 56, accessed November 9, 2012, Ebook Central.

5. Jane Austen, Persuasion (1818; Project Gutenberg, 2012), chap. 5, accessed January 21, 2013, http://www.gutenberg.org/files
/158/158-h/158-h.htm.

6. Paul Tough, How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012), Kindle edition, chap. 2.

Bibliography

Decker, Peter. Old Fences, New Neighbors. Golden, CO: Fulcrum, 2006. Accessed November 9, 2012. Ebook Central.

Austen, Jane. Persuasion. 1818, Project Gutenberg, 2012. Accessed January 21, 2013. http://www.gutenberg.org/files/158/158-h/158-h.htm.

Tough, Paul. How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012. Kindle edition.

Encyclopedia or dictionary

Well known encyclopedias and dictionaries are normally cited only in the notes and not in the bibliography. The publication information is not required (see example 7 & 8).  Reference works that are not well known are cited in both places with full publication information (see example 9).

If the reference work is arranged in alphabetical order, place “s.v.” (meaning “under the word”) in front of the entry you are citing. For longer entries with an author, list under the author’s name and indicate the pages (see example 9).

Note

7. The New Encyclopaedia Britannica: Micropedia, 15th ed., s.v. “Suicide.”

8. Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed., s.v. “badinage.”

9. Margaret Pabst Battin, “Suicide,” in Encyclopedia of Bioethics, ed. Stephen G. Post (New York: Macmillan-Thomson, 2004), 2477.

Bibliography

Battin, Margaret Pabst. “Suicide.” In Encyclopedia of Bioethics, edited by Stephen G. Post, 2475-2483. New York: Macmillan-Thomson, 2004.

Online encyclopedia

Well known encyclopedias and dictionaries are normally cited only in the notes and not in the bibliography. The publication information is not required.  Reference works that are not well known are cited in both places with available publication information. Include the access date. The DOI (if available) or the URL is added at the end of the citation.

If the reference work is arranged in alphabetical order, place “s.v.” (meaning “under the word”) in front of the entry you are citing. For longer entries with an author, list under the author’s name (see example 11).

For reference works from a library database such as Credo Reference include the publication information, the access date, and the name of the database (see example 12).

Note

10. Merriam-Webster, s.v. “establishment,” accessed December 19, 2012, http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/establishment.

11. Colin McQuillan, “German Idealism,” in Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, ed. James Friesen and Bradley Dowden, last updated April 23, 2012, accessed March 5, 2013, http://www.iep.utm.edu/germidea/.

12. “War Crimes,” in World of Criminal Justice, ed. Shirelle Phelps, (Farmington: Gale, 2002), accessed February 10, 2014, Credo Reference.

Bibliography

McQuillan, Colin. “German Idealism.” In Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, edited by James Friesen and Bradley Dowden. Last updated April 23, 2012. Accessed March 5, 2013. http://www.iep.utm.edu/germidea/.

“War Crimes.” In World of Criminal Justice, edited by Shirelle Phelps. Farmington: Gale, 2002. Accessed February 10, 2014. Credo Reference.

For more examples visit the OWL (Online Writing Lab) at Purdue University or ask for help at the library reference desk.

Guide to inserting footnotes using Word (Microsoft Support).