Chicago: Citing Other Sources

The examples found in the Chicago section are based on the style guide The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th ed., 2017. Follow the formats and examples below to cite several types of miscellaneous sources.

Format

  • Chicago style does not offer guidelines on how to cite sources from coursepacks. We suggest that you give the details of the article. This information is often found in the table of contents.
  • Next, add “reprinted in” followed by the course title, the teacher (as editor) and the publication information of the coursepack.

Footnotes

1. Douglas Birsch, “Divine Command Theory,” in Ethical Insights: A Brief Introduction (New York: McGraw Hill, 2002), 33-34, reprinted in Humanities 345-BMF-LA: Ethical Issues in Creative Arts and Modern Languages, ed. Jennifer Semansky (Saint-Lambert, QC: Champlain College Bookstore, Winter 2012).

2. Sherry Intini, “Are We Raising Our Boys to be Underachieving Men?,” Macleans, October 25, 2010, 67, reprinted in Humanities 345-101-MO: Gender and Knowledge, ed. Rachel Morris (Saint-Lambert: Champlain College Bookstore, Winter 2012).

Bibliography

Birsch, Douglas. “Divine Command Theory.”  In Ethical Insights: A Brief Introduction. New York: McGraw Hill, 2002. Reprinted in Humanities 345-BMF-LA: Ethical Issues in Creative Arts and Modern Languages, edited by Jennifer Semansky. Saint-Lambert, QC: Champlain College Bookstore, Winter 2012.

Intini, Sherry. “Are We Raising Our Boys to be Underachieving Men?” Macleans, October 25, 2010. Reprinted in Humanities 345-101-MO: Gender and Knowledge, edited by Rachel Morris. Saint-Lambert: Champlain College Bookstore, Winter 2012.

Format

  • Include the name of the lecturer, the title or subject of the lecture, the format (in parentheses in the notes), Course Name, location, and date of the lecture.
  • For lectures accessed online, include the access date and the URL of the course site.

Footnotes

3. Rebecca Collins, “Database Searching,” (online lecture, Introduction to Library Research, Champlain College Saint-Lambert, Saint-Lambert, QC, Fall 2012), accessed October 13, 2012, http://moodle.mychamplain.ca/course/view.php?id=767.

4. Sam Desrosiers, “Crime in the Workplace,” (class lecture, Introduction to Criminology, Champlain College, Saint-Lambert, QC, October 15, 2011).

Bibliography

Collins, Rebecca. “Database Searching.”  Online lecture, Introduction to Library Research, Champlain College Saint-Lambert, Saint-Lambert, QC, Fall 2012. Accessed October 13, 2012. http://moodle.mychamplain.ca
/course/view.php?id=767.

Desrosiers, Sam. “Crime in the Workplace.”  Class lecture, Introduction to Criminology, Champlain College, Saint-Lambert, QC. October 15, 2011.

Format

  • When citing a film, include any facts relevant to identifying the item. If the film has been re-released on a DVD include the original release date (see example 6).
  • For online videos, see the Web Documents section.

Footnotes

5. It’s a Girl’s World, directed and written by Lynn Glazier (Montreal: National Film Board of Canada, 2004), DVD.

6. Schindler’s List, directed by Steven Spielberg (1993, Los Angeles: Universal Studios Home Entertainment, 2005), DVD.

Bibliography

It’s a girl’s world. Directed and written by Lynn Glazier. Montreal: National Film Board of Canada, 2004. DVD.

Schindler’s List. Directed by Steven Spielberg. 1993. Los Angeles: Universal Studios Home Entertainment, 2005. DVD.

Format

  • Begin with the name of the person interviewed followed by the name of the interviewer, if given.
  • A published interview is treated like an article in a journal or a chapter in a book (example 7). For a broadcast interview, include the title of the program and the date it was broadcast (example 8).
  • Add the access date and the URL if the interview was consulted online.

Footnotes

6. Danny Elfman, interview by Owen Williams, “Exclusive: Danny Elfman Career Interview,” Empire, accessed April 16, 2013, http://www.empireonline.com/interviews/interview.asp?IID=1652.

7. James P. Collins, interview by Tim Beardsley, “James P. Collins: Seeking Biology’s Growing Points,” Bioscience 56, no. 2 (2006): 106-108, accessed July 25, 2018, ProQuest Research Library (216478129).

8. Elie Wiesel, interview by Ted Koppel, Nightline, ABC, April 18, 2002.

Bibliography

Elfman, Danny. Interview by Owen Williams. “Exclusive: Danny Elfman Career Interview.” Empire. Accessed April 16, 2013.  http://www.empireonline.com/interviews/interview.asp?IID=1652.

Collins, James P. Interview by Tim Beardsley. “James P. Collins: Seeking Biology’s Growing Points.” Bioscience 56, no.2 (2006): 106-108. Accessed July 25, 2018. ProQuest Research Library (216478129).

Wiesel, Elie. Interview by Ted Koppel. Nightline. ABC. April 18, 2002.

Format

  • Chicago style generally discourages the use of indirect sources (secondary citations). Try to find the original source and cite it instead.
  • However, if the original source is unavailable to you, information about both the original and secondary source must be included in the notes using “quoted in.” Only the source that was actually consulted needs to be included in the bibliography.
  • In this example, a quote by Simi Linton was found in a book by Beth Omansky. Omansky’s book is the one being consulted and is added to the bibliography.

Footnotes

9.  Simi Linton, Claiming Disability: Knowledge and Identity (New York: University Press, 1998), 17, quoted in Beth Omansky, Borderland of Blindness (Boulder, CO: Lynne Reinner, 2011), 182.

Bibliography

Omansky, Beth. Borderland of Blindness. Boulder, CO: Lynne Reinner, 2011.

Format

  • Sacred text references usually appear only in the footnotes and not the bibliography.
  • When citing the Bible, include the book, chapter and verse.
  • In the case of the Quran, include the sections and verse.
  • The version or translator of the sacred text should also be noted.

Footnotes

10. Gen. 7:1-24 (King James version).

11. Qur’an 19:17-21 (trans. Rachad Khalifa).

Format

  • Personal communications (email, private letters, personal interviews, memos, etc.) are usually a part of the text or included in a note.
  • They are not listed in the bibliography.

Footnotes

12. William Fowler, telephone conversation with the author, April 16, 2010.